About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
MSNBCW 18
LANGUAGE
English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18
. this means that israel and hamas had reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet, and that this will be the first phase of a deal. that will be followed by a second phase in days or weeks or months of much more intense negotiations. those talks will be anchored by and guaranteed by egypt, but with the strong participation of the united states to resolve key demands on both sides which are still out there. the main demand from hamas who wants the block aid of gaza lifted immediately, that is not going to happen, the israelis want an immediate end to all smuggling of arms and to gaza and the sinai, that has not happened either. they have agreed to these demands but need to work that out. >> stephanie gosk, you're in israel where we've experienced -- they've experienced the first bus bombing in years. the first terror attack on tel aviv since 2006. tell us about what happened, the damage, and the victims? >> sure. they're calling it a terrorist attack, andrea, although not a suicide bombing. it is a commuter bus around lunch time today and at least a dozen people inj
that protects and enhances israel's security and regional stability and an outcome that can lead to improved conditions for the civilian residents of gaza. >> does that mean a cease-fire is imminent? showdown over benghazi. top intelligence officials tell nbc news they knew from the beginning that benghazi was a terrorist act but kept susan rice's talking points deliberately vague. on capitol hill, 97 house republicans sent a letter to the president calling rice unfit to serve as secretary of state. they of course play no role in whether she gets the job. >>> plus the general's wife. an insider's perspective on the strains on military marriages. >>> celebrating the big 7-0. vice president gets a tweet from the boss, obama not springsteen. >> i'm andrea mitchell in washington. hillary clinton will land in israel within the next few hours and head directly to jerusalem to meet with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. the exchange of fire continued today from both sides. joining me now nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv and ayman mohyeldin in gaza. martin, to you, what are israelis sa
, this is the egyptian leader, has the direct contacts with hamas. neither united states or israel has that. the decision to send secretary clinton i'm told by white house aides is neither an acknowledgment things are close neither do they feel things got stuck. they feel heir presence, first in israel and then in ramallah in the west bank, meaning with the palestinian authority, then in cairo could nudge along the process to see if they could get to a point of some sort of negotiated cease-fire. as far as the united states is concerned, what spokesperson said, that begins with hamas stopping the rocket fire into israel and then a longer negotiated settlement, they hope, can be agreed upon. >> chuck todd live in cambodia. thanks so much. as chuck was just talking about, secretary of state hillary clinton is going to be heading directly from cambodia to israel to try to help work out a diplomatic solution to the violent escalation of tensions in gaza. nbc's chapman bell is live with us for the situation there. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as calls for a cease-fire grow, the violence does conti
israel today. one sent flying in the direction of jerusalem. israeli police said more than 60 rockets were fired by midday. thousands of israeli reservists remain gathered at the border with gaza. israel threatening to take the next step if if hamas doesn't stop the rocket fire into israel. the next step ground troops moving in. we want to bring in ambassador dennis ross, served as adviser to four presidents and is a mideast diplomacy analyst. it's great to have you with me today. big news coming within the last hour, al jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk
clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both. stephanie, i want to start with you, is the attack we were just discussing in tel aviv an indication that cease-fire talks are not actually on track? >> no, that's not the case, ari. they aren't necessarily connected. at the very least they're are probably -- it's probably complicating the conversations, but right now, the talks keep going on, the negotiations keep going on. israeli officials saying they still are looking for that guarantee that rockets aren't going to come out of gaza towards israel. that is their stipulation. we heard the defense minister ehud barak say today that right out of the gate, what they w
500 hamas rockets have fallen in israel. israeli air strikes have killed at least 90 gazans. nbc's richard engel, stephanie gosk and ayman mohyeldin are in the region reporting the latest from gaza to tel aviv. first richard engel in gaza, what is the latest from your vantage point and on the cease-fire negotiations? >> we are hearing that there are serious cease-fire negotiations going on right now. when you're on the ground here in gaza it doesn't exactly feel that way. there have been many air strikes today, a media building was killed. israel is sort of -- [ inaudible ] on hamas leader or one palestinian militant at a time. sources who are involved in the israeli/palestinian negotiations working toward a cease-fire, these talks taking place in cairo have told nbc news they are serious, that they are making progress and that this is how the negotiations stand right at this moment. the israelis want a two-part deal, a two-stage deal. the first part would be an immediate hostility, immediate cessation of violence, both sides stop attacking each other. that would be unconditional
assembly despite strong opposition by the u.s. and israel. here's israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu earlier today. >> the palestinians must recognize the jewish state. and they must be prepared to end the conflict with israel once and for all. none of these vital interests, these vital interests of peace, none of them appear in the resolution that will be put forward before the general assembly today. and that is why israel cannot accept it. >> joining me now to talk more about this, former state department mideast officer joel ruben. also palestinian italian journalist and msnbc contributor willa jabroe. both israel and the u.s. say the resolution violates agreements to solve issues through negotiations which broke down two years ago. on the heels of the recent violent clashes between gaza and israel is now the right time for this vote? >> well, it's a fate acomply that the vote is going to take place. it's been in the works for some time before -- really the bigger issue is how will the parties react after it? there's been a calm reaction to far. there should be one. they need to
edition of "msnbc live." developing now the ceasefire between israel and hamas may have been broken. palestinian medical services say a man was killed by israeli forces on the gaza side of the border. israel's army has not yet been able to verify the death but this all comes after a day and a half of calm in the region following those eight days of rocket and missile attacks that left nearly 170 dead. we have reporters on both sides of the conflict. we begin with ayman mohyeldin in gaza. to the details of this possible break in the ceasefire. what do you know on that? >> reporter: good morning, alex. palestinian medical services have identified the body of a 23-year-old they say was killed by israeli gunshots as he and about 3,300 other people approach the gaza/israel border. now generally speaking israel and gaza border is mostly farmland. there is an area that is about 300 meters or so that the israeli have declared a no-go zone. that has been used to attack israeli border posts and attempts to kidnap israeli soldiers. for the most part they are aware that is a no-go zone. followi
's friday, november 23. welcome to msnbc live. developing now the ceasefire between israel and hamas may have been broken. palestinian medical services say a man was killed by israeli forces on the gaza side of the border. israeli government spokesman mark regev told me an hour ago they are still looking into the incident. they have not confirmed that it happened, but this all comes after a day and a half of calm in the region following those eight days of rocket and missile attacks which left nearly 170 dead. >>> we have reporters on both sides of the conflict and we begin with nbc news' ayman my yell d mohyeldin. >> reporter: palestinian factions and medical sources are not making any doubt as to who is responsible for this violation of the ceasefire. the israeli military says it may not have confirmed it killed anyone but no doubt after speaking to the family of the victim as well as the sources here on the ground there has been one person killed as a result of that attack. now according to palestinians, this was in their eyes their right to go to the territory which is a no go zone b
, it will be a familiar scene on the ground here in israel for people in tel aviv and all across the country. this was a tactic used a lot by palestinian militants about a decade ago. in recent years they haven't seen it. the last bus blast was back in 2004. and just soon after it, a spokesman for hamas came out with a statement calling it a heroic attack. chris? >> stephanies go income tel aviv for us. thank you. i want to play for you something hillary clinton had to say yesterday. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to de-escalate the situation in gaza. the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> obviously, there's a lot at stake here for the people who live in the region, for the entire international community. but politically, i'm wondering what's at stake for hillary clinton and for this white house that seems to be approaching the middle east process differently than it did in the first term. >
in the middle east, where the fragile truce between israel and gaza hamas rulers appears to be holding 19 hours after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying
turmoil. >> former defense -- well, defense minister and former prime minister in israel has announced he's not seeking a position in the next cabinet after the election. does this signal anything about the situation vis-a-vis iran since he was one of the most hawkish of the cabinet members on iran? >> no doubt it reflects i'm sure a set of personal considerations for him, but the fact is he has been the architect of the options vis-a-vis iran, he has been the one who basically has outlined why it has to be dealt with, even though he wants to put it in the context of close u.s./israeli relations. ultimately israel has to find a way to deal with it either on its own or with us. >> israel has talked about a ship that's loaded with rockets potentially heading to gaza. so is there another crisis brewing? where do we stand with the cease-fire, where both sides seem to be testing each other the last few days? >> i believe the cease-fire in fact is going to hold. if you look at all three parties who were involved in it aside from the united states, who i think did play a pivotal role at the end.
in the region. when we saw in the past week egypt rise to the forefront of mediating between israel and the palestinian factions, it was because egypt at that particular point was not -- president morrissey's hand to put leverage on them. it's a political organization from which mohammed morsi comes from. stability will have long term and regional implications for all of the issues. but in terms of immediate truce, right now it is about what's happening on the ground be in gaza and right now that is not necessarily directly linked. >> all right, everyone. we were listening there to nbc's ayman and we're taking satellite hits. this conflict is raising a question concerning security in the middle east. the role iran played with arming hamas and its own stand offwith israel. joining me is dennis ross of the washington institute for institutional policy. dennis, welcome. let's talk about the role that iran played in this conflict over the last eight, nine days. iron that out for me. >> i think we have to put it into larger perspective. i don't think they've played a role over the last f
a victory in their fight against israel and we heard from some of the leadership of that palestinian faction that times of the arab spring have changed the palestinian/israeli conflict. we expect that to have a profound impact on the situation here in gaza and across the region. they are certainly trying to spin this in a way where to their people they are coming out victorious and prepared for any possible confrontation down the road. tinge ordinary people here in gaza when you speak to them as we have throughout the course of the day have been telling us without a comprehensive solution that history is deemed to repeat itself. without a solution to end the problems of the israeli palestinian conflict, particularly here in gaza, expect it to be another round of violence somewhere on the horizon. >> ayman, thank you, reporting from gaza. martin fletcher is standing by now in tel aviv. what's the feeling there today 20 hours after the cease-fire? are people feeling good about this? describe that. >> reporter: to be honest, alex, i don't think people are feeling too bad about it. i think they
, israel is demanding that hamas stop firing rockets across the border. is there a willingness to do this or has the number of civilian casualties made a cease-fire now much less likely? >> well, you know, the fact that the negotiations are ongoing is an indication that palestinian factions can abide by the truce. in fact, in the past it's been on multiple occasions documented that palestinian factions have been committed to the truce until there's been some kind of violation, if you will, from the israeli side that israel justifies as an act in its own security. nonetheless, palestinian factions say they have abided by it in the past, they would abide by it again in the future if there is one in place. the question is can they get to that agreement in the next couple hours before time runs out. and the question really surrounding the truce have to deal with the cessation of hostilities. israel wants an immediate cessation of hostilities. then enter into negotiations about lifting a five-year-old siege and blockade on gaza. palestinians say that is unacceptable. that it has to be an
the cease-fire because israel's response was quick. they fired warning shots at the palestinians, in the end they ended up killing one of the forces. palestinians are going to be protesting that to the united nations. but at the same time hamas also responded quickly. today they're keeping protesters away from the fence. they don't want any more of these kinds of clashes with israelis see as provocations. so i think it's clear both sides do want the cease-fire to continue. they both have a very strong vested interest in doing so. and that kind of incident yesterday, which led to the unfortunate death of one palestinian, i doubt that will be repeated in the days to come. the emphasis on both sides is going to be on the next stage, which as you mentioned, which is outlining the details, dealing with the details of what the cease-fire is, what it leads to. what they've got so far is what they've called quiet for quiet. both sides not shooting. what's next is the beginning of the negotiations. it's quite clear what the two sides want although it's going to appear complicated. it's simple and it'
he may have been poisoned by israel. a claim israel denies. he died in paris in 2004, a month after falling suddenly ill at his west bank compound. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. >>> the high financial cost of hurricane sandy is coming into focus. new york has requested $42 billion in aid and new jersey officials estimate they suffered at least $29 billion in losses, bringing the total of $71 billion in the two hardest hit states. sandy was in some ways worse than hurricane katrina, citing the high economic cost and property destruction. meanwhile, a top executive and a trustee for the power company have resigned in the wake of the company's slow response in getting power back to new yorkers on long island. >>> here's a look at some of the other stories topping the news right now. a fast-moving storm system sweeping through the mid-atlantic this morning bringing a wet mixture of rain and snow. the storm is expected to put down 1 to 3 inches of snow from west virginia
that is facing pressure from extremes. it was the extremists who were shooting the rockets over to israel. there were negotiations going on to get that stopped. >> are you saying hamas are moderates? >> compared to the salafists and al qaeda, yeah. they are a muslim brotherhood government which is why morsi had the leverage to negotiate the cease-fire. >> mika, a lot of interesting things, talking about foreign policy going on here at home, talking about who the next secretary of state may be, john mccain said, along with lindsey graham and several others, who said they were going to fight susan rice tooth and nail, that sort of changed over the weekend, didn't it? >> that appears to be changing just a tad bit. heilmann, you wrote about it. senator mccain is softening his attacks on u.n. ambassador susan rice after vowing to block her potential nomination as secretary of state. republicans claim ambassador rice deliberately misled the country in the aftermath of the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. but rice says that she's not to blame, arguing she relied on the ta
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18